Loved That? Look Into This! Part I

Afternoon bookworms! My mood today can pretty much be summed up by one of my favorite 30 Rock scenes:

Image result for lemon it's wednesday

But at least that means it’s now officially halfway through the week! Yay! On this fine Hump Day I wanted to do a Part I of my new “Loved that? Try this!” series where I will be giving my recommendations based on books with similar themes, characters, or plots.

I’m going to start off my first edition by featuring some of my favorite thrillers from the last year or so. And with that, let’s begin!

LOVED All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda? LOOK INTO The Perfect Stranger by Megan Miranda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ok I know, I know I’m kind of cheating with this pick here since it’s the same author, BUT hear me out and cut me some slack because it’s the first recommendation on this list 🙂 What I loved the most about All the Missing Girls was the ever-present sinister and creepy am-I-being-watched undertones throughout the novel. Megan Miranda does a phenomenal job of writing eerie and atmospheric scenes that make your skin crawl. It’s not even that the plot should be considered horror, but the way she describes the woods, the caves, and even the old creaky house, is truly something horrific.

Although I loved the plot too, and loved how the novel was uniquely set backward, it was this atmospheric aspect that truly captivated me in just one or two sittings. If this aspect is what drew you too, that’s why I recommend reading more of her work. It’s not because story lines for All the Missing Girls and The Perfect Stranger are similar. Instead, the tone of being watched and that increasing paranoia and anxiety is skillfully done in both books.

There are definitely a few similar themes in the novels, and themes I typically gravitate toward- the mysterious and enigmatic best girl friend. I love books that focus on a mystery surrounding one person’s secrets and the main character having to uncover who they really were. Miranda definitely seems to like this theme too, as it’s present in both novels, and another reason why if you liked All The Missing Girls you eat up The Perfect Stranger too.

One last aspect that I really love about these books- and please don’t laugh or judge- the covers of these books are so soft and I just love holding them while I read. If you read this in print, you must know what I mean!

And one more last, LAST thing. She has a new book coming out Jan 29, 2019! I can’t wait!!

LOVED The Memory Watcher by Minka Kent? LOOK INTO Only Daughter by Anna Snoekstra

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I’ve previously written about these two in short, but never explicitly connected why they are so perfect for readers of a very specific theme. When you break it down, The Memory Watcher and Only Daughter both focus on someone lying or putting on an act of someone different than who they really are for their own benefit. I don’t want to get too deep into spoiler territory on either of these, but that’s basically what you need to know about both books.

If you were entranced in how the narrator in The Memory Watcher assumed her role as a nanny to watch over the neighbor’s baby, you will just as much love how the woman in Only Daughter assumes her role as a girl missing years prior. Both books share webs of family secrets, deception, and twisty climaxes. And when it comes down to it, I could just really see both main characters in each book getting along. Maaaaybe it’s because they both have a knack for manipulating and deceiving, but hey I never said it would be a healthy friendship.

Similarly to my recommendation for All the Missing Girls and The Perfect Stranger for their tones, The Memory Watcher and Only Daughter had the same undercurrents of lying, as well as very flawed main characters and very flawed family relations. Both of these books surprised me by how much they, well, surprised me- both incredibly underrated twisty page-turners that I recommend to all psycho-thriller-lovers, and especially for fans of each respective book.

LOVED The Last Time I Lied by Riley Sager? LOOK INTO Little Monsters by Kara Thomas

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At first glance, or first back-of-the-book-synopsis, these two books may seem like they have nothing in common. The Last Time I Lied is about a woman returning to her childhood summer camp and reliving the lies, terrors, and traumas of her past the night her friends disappeared. Little Monsters, on the other hand, is about a small town struck by tragedy and unanswerable questions when an average high school student goes missing after a party. One obvious similarity here is the disappearance and search for a missing high schooler, but the themes go so much deeper than that; because let’s face it, most all thrillers these days have a missing girl. However, these are not just stories of a missing girl- they’re stories of past trauma, teenage angst, young bullies, and childish nostalgia- and the missing girls are honestly just a coincidence in this case.

While reading both of these novels, I felt a creeping nostalgia and attachment for aspects of my younger self in a way I haven’t before. Both have all of the usual teenage suspects: angst, crushes, cattiness, and lying. It’s not exactly a positive nostalgia that I feel for these situations, but more of an emotional familiarity to these forgotten feelings. In The Last Time I Lied, I felt like I was traveling through space and time to my own camp days where all kids want to do is hang out with the older, cooler kids. The main character gets assigned a cabin of older girls who quickly show her the ways of the camp while also quickly losing some innocence. Just like in All The Missing Girls, I love the stories where there are enigmatic and flawed friends who you just can’t help but be drawn too. In the same way, The Last Time I Lied draws you into these older girls, make you want to be a part of the group, and most importantly know their secrets, all while feeling an odd sense of familiarity for teenage years as a girl. Plus there is a good ol’ mystery of what was the fate of these teenagers, and you know I was on the case for that part too, of course.

So yes, there is also the disappearance of a teenager in Little Monsters, but again it’s not just solving a mystery that’s important in this one. If you liked that sense of nostalgia for being a teenager with secrets and lies then Little Monsters is also a must-read. Instead of being taken back to my camp days in this one, I was taken back to those high school student-packed hallways, parties, and sneaking around. (I promise Mom I only snuck out once! I honestly think I was so un-sneaky that you even knew too!) The  familiar feeling of being a teenager who just wants to make friends, get your crush to notice you, and deal with rumors was all too real in this one. Don’t get me wrong, even though it’s YA, it’s not some vapid high school story. It is a story of grief, trauma, and growing up. And yes! A nice twisty and shocking mystery!

In both books, you really get a deep understanding of the inside of a teenage girl’s mind, and really see what teenagers can be capable of amidst the lies and hardships of growing up. There is also a fun sense of a creepy and foreboding force, but I promise it’s all still realistic! So if you enjoyed these themes in The Last Time I Lied, you will devour Little Monsters just as eagerly!

That’s a wrap for Part I of “Loved this? Look into that!” I swear I don’t only read books about missing girls, but would it be so bad if I did?!

Have you loved any of these and recommend looking into something else? I always want to hear from you guys! Comment below!

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